Operating, Riding Style, & Tips

Operations

Pedal off as you ease into the trigger throttle and you are underway! To stop, release pressure on the throttle and apply the brakes, the engine has an automatic clutch and will idle. Turn engine off by pressing the red kill button OR turn the choke on the engine to the OFF position and press the throttle. Increase engine, clutch and belt life, assist your engine – pedal a few strokes – when taking off from a stand still, after corning, when accelerating and on hills.

When on inclines so long or steep that speed drops below 10-12 mph; the clutch heats up, slips, begins loosing traction. ** Caution** Holding throttle wide open, trying to power up the hill, will cause damage to clutch, engine, belt and drive gear! ** Recommended** Let Off on throttle a bit, Pedal to assist engine (allowing engine to cool), – as you feel clutch re-engage, Slowly increase throttle pressure As you pedal, to increase your speed.

Operating/Riding Style

GEBE is a bicycle Assist unit – not a motorcycle/scooter. There are times you must assist the engine (on take-off, on steeper hills) but Most of the time it assists you! There is a ‘learning curve’ associated with operation/riding style of any engine, a bicycle engine is no exception.

Pedal off as you ease onto the trigger throttle and you are underway! To stop, release pressure on the throttle and apply the brakes, the engine has an automatic clutch and will idle when at a stop. Increase engine, clutch and belt life, assist your engine – pedal a few strokes – when taking off from a stand still, after corning and on inclines. Don’t have to pedal up to any certain speed, just start the bike rolling as you ease into the throttle. For a faster take-off, pedal a few more strokes.

*** You can damage the clutch on up-hill runs, at speeds too Slow for full clutch engagement. If possible, build up speed as you approach the incline. When on inclines so long or steep that speed drops below 10-12 mph, clutch heats up, will slip, begin loosing traction. I always try to build up a little speed as I approach inclines (too lazy to want to pedal That much).

Holding throttle wide open, trying to power up the hill, will cause damage to clutch, engine, belt and drive gear! Let Off on throttle a bit (allowing clutch to cool), Pedal to assist engine – as you feel clutch re-engage, Slowly increase throttle pressure as you pedal, to increase your speed.

*** You can damage the clutch when coasting downhill, if your speed exceeds top engine speed, on level ground. Engine runs too lean when over-revved, coasting downhill and/or pedaling downhill at excessive speeds – i.e. running Faster than engine is capable of pushing you on level ground!!!

It goes against my grain to give throttle a pull, as if to give engine the gas, on that downhill leg – BUT – it engages the clutch, which I Do appreciate, it lugs the bike down, reduces the speed, I don’t have to stand on my brakes, risking over heating rim and tires, may cause a blow-out!

Cresting the hill, if speed slows down to +/- 10 mph, clutch falls out of engagement, you Will be freewheeling down hill. If you aren’t using the engine, the belt will make ‘slapping’ sound – belt continues to travel around gear on drive shaft and ring, chance is increased that you could damage belt.

If you want to fly down hill at excessive speed, it would be better to turn engine off and remove belt from drive ring first. WEAR YOUR HELMET!

Fuel Mix

4-stroke Engines use unleaded gasoline only

ONLY USE 87 OCTANE (or better) IN 4-STROKES – DO NOT PREMIX GAS

Fuel Mixture 2-strokes only

Require a 50:1 gas/oil mixture -SEE CHART.
Only use high quality 50:1, Air cooled, 2-stroke mixing oil and 87 (or better) octane gas.
fuelmix
** See Owner/Operator Manual for Fuels / Oil and/or Mixing instructions **

Starting the Engine

ALWAYS FLIP BELT TENSION ARM TO THE ‘ON’ POSITION BEFORE STARTING ENGINE, TO AVOID BELT DAMAGE.

Starting instructions for your specific engine are covered in the manual accompanying your engine.

Starting procedure is the same as with any 2 or 4-stroke engine. But for those with no experience – when engine is cold or has not been run for a while – Flip belt tension arm to ON position, Fig. I(a) prime carburetor with primer bubble, until fuel flows through return line. You cannot flood engine by over priming.Fig. I(b) move engine’s choke lever Closed/ON position, pull cord a couple of times, No more than 3-4 pulls (Can flood engine!) – engine will want to fire, now turn choke lever to OFF/RUN position, engine may stall and you will need to pull cord again, engine should start and idle. When engine warms up or after a few minutes of use, with choke OFF all you need to do is pull the cord to start. Will start easier and faster as engine ‘breaks in’.

StartingTheEngine

Tips

  • DO NOT MODIFY MOUNTING PARTS OR CHANGE ANY ANGLES – any changes will effect performance and/or operation. Mount modification may void your warranty.
  • ALWAYS flip belt tension arm to the ‘ON’ position BEFORE starting engine. Avoid belt damage, do not engage engine with tension arm in OFF posistion!
  • If you removed engine to change a gear, BE SURE to push engine Completely back onto the drive shaft. Tighten engine lock bolt firmly.
  • FOR MAX ENGINE LIFE AND PERFORMANCE, use 89 octane gas, and RedMax oil.
  • Put a little liquid soap on the spoke slots before installing the drive ring, this will minimize risk of damage to slots. Q-tips work great for applying soap.
  • Engine idles too fast, continues to rev when at a stop? Usually throttle cable has been pulled too tight, loosen ties and relax the cable, do not have sharp bends or kinks. May need to check cable at carburetor fitting, make sure cable sits inside brass barrel.
  • Kill button doesn’t turn engine off? Check handlebars, they may be painted or have a clear coat, not allowing kill button to properly ground. Scrape bar where kill button screw locks to bar.
  • Pedaling short distances, drag on belt will not be very noticeable but, when pedaling for a long distance, NOT using engine, and want ZERO drag on the belt – Remove belt, rolling wheel as you lift belt from track on drive ring, wrap belt around seat post, secure with twist ties, check to be sure belt is not touching any moving parts. Convenient way to carry spare belt when on long bike trips, if your belt ever breaks, you only need to run new belt around gear and into belt track of drive ring.
  • Increase engine, clutch and belt life, assist your engine – pedal a few strokes when accelerating – taking off from a stand still, after corning or when climbing hills and you can catch your pedals.
  • Have tires larger than 2.125, need just a little more room between belt and tire for clearance? Space drive gear out on drive shaft by placing a washer between gear & engine mount on the drive shaft. If belt still hits knobs, trim tips of tire knobs with scissors or razor knife. Tighten gear firmly!